Published: Sun, April 15, 2018

Miloš Forman, director of 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest,' is dead at 86

Miloš Forman, director of 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest,' is dead at 86

Forman, who left his homeland of Czechoslovakia for the USA, helmed the films "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975), "Hair" (1979), "Ragtime" (1981), "Amadeus" (1984), "Valmont" (1989), "The People vs. Larry Flynt" (1996) and "Man on the Moon" (1999), among others, winning the Oscar twice.

However, it was during the 1960s that Forman became a well-recognized film director for "Loves of a Blonde" and "The Firemen's Ball", both of which were also nominated for the Oscars in the best foreign film category.

After making acclaimed films in Czechoslovakia, Forman left his country for good in 1968 after the Soviet crackdown on the short-lived period of relatively free political and artistic expression known as Prague Spring.

Forman established his reputation in America four years later with the release of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, featuring Jack Nicholson in the lead.

In 1967, Forman received permission to travel to the United States to make his first American film for Paramount Pictures.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975).


For these pictures, the Director was awarded the Academy award in the nomination "Best Director work". College would allow him to pursue this passion and his travel to NY in the 1960s gave him the latitude he needed to make his films without censorship from communist authorities.

"Very sad to hear that the great director Miloš Forman has passed away", director Edgar Wright wrote.

The People vs Larry Flynt (1996). His other movies included Hair (1979), Ragtime (1981), Valmont (1989), Man on the Moon (1999) and Goya's Ghosts (2006), the latter of which proved to be his final directorial offering. Although he later collaborated with Vaclav Havel to adapt a novel about the 1938 Munich Agreement that enabled the Nazis to claim control of Czechoslovakia's Sudentenland, the project failed to materialise.

According to a report in CNN, Forman was always fascinated with the world of theatre and he also founded his own amateur theatre group in the 1950s, eventually also studying direction at the Prague Film Academy.

Shortly after, Forman moved to the U.S.

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