Published: Fri, May 18, 2018

U.S. driven by self-interest in wanting to block Russian Federation pipeline -German minister

U.S. driven by self-interest in wanting to block Russian Federation pipeline -German minister

The Minister of economy of Germany Peter Altmaier commented on criticism of the United States of gas pipeline Nord stream-2 and promised to consider Ukraine's interests during its construction.

"Any pipeline project-and there are many multiple pipeline projects in the world that are potentially covered by this sanctions authority-is in an elevated position of sanctions risk", she said. "We would be delighted if the project did not take place".

Sandra Oudkirk, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Energy Diplomacy, said at a meeting with reporters in Germany that companies involved in the construction of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline may be subject to U.S. sanctions. The project includes two parallel lines.

Ahead of a summit due later on Friday between Merkel and Russian President Vladimir Putin, Altmaier said the European Union should guarantee that Ukraine will continue to receive gas transit fees, even after the pipeline is built under the Baltic.

"The new project would permit new technologies to be placed along the pipeline route and that is a threat".


"We just want to make the transit of gas through Ukraine was guaranteed and secured not only by Ukraine and Russian Federation but also the European Union", - quotes the Minister DW.

Opponents of the project - including Poland, the Baltic States, Ukraine, Moldova, USA and Denmark argue that the "Nord stream-2" will increase the EU's dependence on Gazprom, which already supplies about a third of the volume of gas in the EU.

As previously reported "FACTS", the President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko warned Germany from participating in the construction of the "Nord stream-2", proposing as an alternative to the modernization of the transit pipeline passing through the territory of Ukraine.

Merkel sent her economy minister, Peter Altmaier, on a frantic diplomatic trip to Moscow and Kiev this week in an effort to secure a deal that would keep some gas flowing through Ukraine, which now earns up to 2 billion euros a year from transit fees.

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