Published: Fri, May 18, 2018

Zuckerberg agrees to closed-door meeting with European Parliament

Zuckerberg agrees to closed-door meeting with European Parliament

While Zuckerberg testified last month to the U.S. Congress, he had always been noncommittal on his appearance in Europe, sending his chief technical officer to speak to the British parliament and delaying confirmation of any visit to Brussels.

"We have accepted the Council of President's proposal to meet with leaders of the European Parliament and appreciate the opportunity for dialogue, to listen to their views and show the steps we are taking to better protect people's privacy", a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement. The social networking company reported $1.69 earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter, beating analysts' consensus estimates of $1.25 by $0.44.

It is a "snub to the United Kingdom and the millions of Facebook users in the United Kingdom who deserve answers", the tweet read.

And that members of the public won't be able to form their own opinions about how Facebook's founder responds to pressing questions about what Zuckerberg's platform is doing to their privacy and their fundamental rights. "It must be a public hearing - why not a Facebook Live?" tweeted Guy Verhofstadt, a Belgian politician who is also a Brexit negotiator on behalf of the European Parliament.

Tajani said that simply showing up to explain himself was already a good move.


Zuckerberg's European Union visit will be his first since a whistleblower alleged that Cambridge Analytica improperly harvested information from over 50 million Facebook accounts to help Donald Trump win the 2016 presidential election.

"Our citizens deserve a full and detailed explanation".

Mr Zuckerberg is also confirmed to visit French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris on May 23, along with other tech leaders, according to the French presidency. Cambridge says none of the Facebook data was used in the Trump campaign, and Facebook is investigating.

The Digital, Culture, Media and Sports Committee said that Alexander Nix had accepted its summons.

After Schroepfer faced a set of tough questions before on MPs' in place of Zuckerberg last month, Collins threatened to compel the Facebook CEO to appear before the committee, writing to Stimson: "It is worth noting that, while Mr Zuckerberg does not normally come under the jurisdiction of the UK Parliament, he will do so the next time he enters the country". While Nix has testified once to the committee, lawmakers want him to give further evidence - a request he had previously declined.

Like this: