Published: Tue, June 12, 2018
Economy | By

Your internet use could change as ‘net neutrality’ ends

Your internet use could change as ‘net neutrality’ ends

A number of states have tried to get around the FCC's repeal by either developing legislation laying out their own net neutrality rules, or by issuing gubernatorial executive orders that limit which Internet providers can do business with the state. Opponents say this gives Internet providers the power to block competitors and new technologies. The FTC can't take action unless something can clearly be proven to be "unfair or deceptive", something that's tricky to do in the net neutrality realm where anti-competitive behavior is often disguised as routine network management. They will have the right to discriminate and favor the Internet traffic of those companies with whom they have pay-for-play arrangements and the right to consign all others to a slow and bumpy road.

Still, supporters have hoped to force a public vote on the issue, because with midterm elections looming some lawmakers might be swayed as net neutrality is a resonant issue with voters.

To put it simply, internet service providers could start charging companies to ensure their content loads at a decent speed, which is very important if a company is to be successful online.

Over 20 states have joined the fight by banning together in a lawsuit to reverse the net neutrality repeal.

The Federal Communications Commission said the repeal will remove problematic regulations.


The Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality went into effect today. The second concern for users is the bundling of services.

Proponents of net neutrality quickly mobilized for the overturn of the FCC's repeal, and last month, the U.S. Senate passed a bill that would scrap the FCC's decision and retain net neutrality rules. If you're interested in letting your representatives know where you stand on net neutrality and how you'd like them to vote, you can see a tally of who has and hasn't agreed to support net neutrality here.

"It is incumbent on the House of Representatives to listen to the voices of consumers, including the millions of Americans who supported the FCC's 2015 net neutrality order, and keep the internet free and open for all", they said in a letter Thursday.

One of the biggest fears surrounding the end of net neutrality is the potential emergence of internet 'bundles, ' comparable to cable bundles where you pay a certain amount to receive a specific number of popular TV channels - just with popular websites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc. instead.

It was put in place by the Obama Administration but President Trump chose to scrap the rule in December. Many Internet providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, have said they do not and will not block or slow content. Comcast has also said it does not block or slow content and has no plans to offer paid prioritization. Meanwhile, at least 29 states have pending legislation that would require ISPs to uphold net neutrality rules, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

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