Published: Wed, June 13, 2018

David Davis says parliament vote can not reverse Brexit

David Davis says parliament vote can not reverse Brexit

Her government is most vulnerable over an amendment, introduced by the upper house of parliament, to change the so-called "meaningful vote" on any final Brexit deal by handing the lower house more power to set the "direction" of the government if it rejects the agreement. - After a rollercoaster week of Brexit rows within her government and with Brussels, British Prime Minister Theresa May will on Tuesday seek to avoid another setback in a long-awaited showdown with parliament.

In the end MPs voted by 324 to 298 to reject the House of Lords proposal, with only two Tories voting against the government.

A bus passes as anti-Brexit demonstrators protest opposite the Houses of Parliament in London, Britain, June 11, 2018.

Liberal Democrat Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said: "As has become a tradition in Brexit negotiations, the Tories have been forced to cobble together a compromise".

Brexit Secretary David Davis urged MPs to "respect the result of the referendum" that approved the withdrawal.

Brexit Secretary David Davis has warned Conservative Party rebels that proposals to give Parliament the power to direct negotiations with the European Union are simply a tactic to overturn the results of the 2016 referendum that mandated Britain's departure from the bloc.

"It's not practical, it's not desirable and it's not appropriate", Davis said.

Speaking on BBC Newsnight, Mr Grieve commented on the Government's concessions, stating: "There was bound to be discussion about the amendment, and that discussion was positive".

Phillip Lee, who resigned this morning, gave an impassioned speech from the "naughty corner" on the backbenches - flanked by Remainers including Bob Neill, Nicky Morgan, receiving congratulations for his decision by Soubry and Sarah Wollaston.


After days of frantic lobbying by Conservative officials to try to get the party on board, May renewed appeals for unity over the "meaningful vote", after the government appeared to have secured a compromise to stop a similar rebellion on Wednesday over Britain's trading ties with the EU.

The Bracknell MP, who called for a second referendum on whatever deal Mrs May secures from the European Union, later told the Commons there was growing evidence that the Government's Brexit policy is "detrimental to the people we were elected to serve".

Keir Starmer, Labour's shadow Brexit secretary, was refusing to accept the government at its word Tuesday.

Rebels have said they will challenge May's plans to leave the customs union with the EU during votes on other bills that will be brought back to the house some time before July 24. A paper laying out the U.K. government position, due to be published this month, has been delayed because the Cabinet can not agree on a united stance.

Parliamentary debates about complex legal amendments rarely rouse much heat, but passions run high over anything to do with Brexit.

Pro-Brexit tabloid the Sun warned lawmakers on Tuesday's front page that they had a choice: "Great Britain or great betrayal".

It featured a British flag and the headline: "Ignore the will of the people at your peril".

They believe that if there is no Brexit deal by the end of November, the government must clear its next course of action with MPs. Her party and her top team of ministers also are deeply split over how to leave the European Union, particularly over the future customs arrangements which have pitted those wanting closer ties with the European Union against others who demand a clean break.

"Parliament, don't stand against the people - implement their will!"

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