Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
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NCAA announces transfer, football redshirt rule changes

NCAA announces transfer, football redshirt rule changes

The NCAA announced changes to rules involving transfers and redshirt procedures Wednesday. At that point, coaches from other schools are free to contact the student. Last season, this opportunity may have led to redshirts like quarterback Tommy DeVito and cornerback Ifeatu Meliufonwu seeing playing time as they prepared to step into larger roles.

The NCAA has made several attempts in recent years to change transfer rules, but this is the first to come up with something substantive - if not comprehensive.

The previous rule was scrutinized as transferring players were limited in what schools they were able to choose from after being blocked from specific programs. Conferences, however, can still put rules in play that forbid student-athletes from transferring within the conference without sitting out a year or some other stipulation. Instead of a student-athlete asking for permission to transfer from his or her school, the student-athlete will now simply inform the school of his or her decision to transfer.

"This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being", said council chair Blake James, who is the athletic director at Miami. "Redshirt football student-athletes are more likely to remain engaged with the team, and starters will be less likely to feel pressure to play through injuries".

Per NCAA.org's Michelle Brutlag Hosick, the Division I Council approved a new "notification-of-transfer " rule that requires schools to enter a student who wishes to transfer into the national transfer database. A proposal was originally presented to the D-I Council in April, but tabled to allow conferences to provide feedback from spring meetings.


Mid-year enrollees will not be allowed to participate in bowl games but, other than that, there are no limitations on the four games redshirt players can participate in.

The Division I Student-Athlete Experience Committee will examine how a similar rule could be applied to other sports and will consult with the Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, according to the NCAA.

That's one way the model could work, but there is no limitation, meaning that a player could be used in game one, then game eight, and then the Big Ten title game, and then the College Football Playoff and still count the year as a redshirt.

Additionally, the proposal adds tampering with a current student-athlete at another school to the list of potential Level 2 violations, considered a significant breach of conduct.

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