Published: Mon, July 09, 2018
Science | By

Tropical Storm Chris could become hurricane

Tropical Storm Chris could become hurricane

Beryl weakened to a tropical storm from a hurricane on Saturday and was forecast to lose more strength toward the end of Sunday.

A tropical watch remained in effect for Dominica Sunday evening, according to the NHC. Rossello, who said the island could experience power outages, urged people without sturdy roofs to move in with relatives or a government shelter.

Meteorologist Marshall Alexander told The Associated Press that officials were anxious about those still living with tarps on their roofs after Maria slammed into Dominica as a Category 5 storm past year, killing dozens of people.

A state of emergency was in effect, the statement said.

As Chris continues to strengthen, Tropical Storm Beryl is dispersing as it "races" towards the Leeward Islands in the northeastern Caribbean Sea, according to the National Hurricane Center. "The system can still cause a lot of damage regardless of whether it's a tropical storm or a hurricane".

In the Caribbean, a tropical storm warning was up on Guadeloupe and Dominica and long lines were reported at grocery stores on several islands as people shopped for food and water.


Forecasters said conditions somewhat conducive for regeneration of a tropical cyclone are expected as Beryl is forecast to move across the Bahamas and the western Atlantic.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Beryl had maximum sustained winds of 45 miles per hour (75 kph) Sunday.

Gradual weakening is anticipated during the next 36 hours, and Beryl is forecast to degenerate into a trough of low pressure as it moves across the Lesser Antilles and into the eastern Caribbean Sea by Monday. It was seen staying well off the US coast.

The same amount, two to three inches, was also expected to fall on the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, with up to five inches possible in some areas, through Tuesday.

Chris was stationary about 180 miles south-southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph, according to the NHC 5 p.m. EDT advisory. Swells generated by Chris are expected to increase and affect portions of the coasts of North Carolina and the mid-Atlantic states during the next few days.

Like this: