Published: Wed, July 11, 2018

Trump's Supreme Court Pick

Trump's Supreme Court Pick

President Donald Trump is expected to make the Supreme Court announcement from the East Room of the White House at 9 p.m. ET Monday.

Now, he is President Donald Trump's nominee to become a Supreme Court justice.

A ferocious confirmation battle with Democrats is expected as the president seeks to shift the nation's highest court further to the right. Dick Durbin once called the "Forrest Gump of Republican politics", later served as partner at the law firm Kirkland & Ellis in Washington, DC, and served as senior associate counsel, associate counsel, assistant to the president, and staff secretary to former President George W. Bush.

The announcement will set in a motion a brutal - and expensive - political battle over Trump's supreme court nominee.

"Throughout legal circles, he is considered a judge's judge, a true thought leader among his peers", Trump said of Kavanaugh. The New York Times reports she says she would like to see the scope of abortion rights changed.

Trump's short list continued to vacillate in the hours leading up to tonight's prime-time finale, where his choice to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy will be revealed.

Republicans hold a slim 51-49 majority in the Senate, though with ailing Senator John McCain battling cancer in his home state of Arizona they now can muster only 50 votes. During her confirmation hearings previous year after she was nominated for U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, she was pressed about the impact her Catholic religious beliefs have on her decisions.

Like the other eight justices on the court, Kavanaugh has an Ivy League law degree, spending his undergraduate and law school years at Yale.


Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, said in a statement, "I join millions of Americans in congratulating Judge Kavanaugh for his nomination, a well-respected jurist widely regarded for his/her intellect, temperament, as well as for his/her dedication to the Constitution". So far, Trump has installed more than 20 appeals court judges and more than 16 trial court judges on the federal bench.

Since the 2016 campaign, Trump has made his process for picking Supreme Court justices fairly transparent. The liberals' effort probably will focus on moderate GOP senators, such as Maine's Susan Collins and Alaska's Lisa Murkowski, who might be wary of adding a hard-line conservative and risking decades-old precedents such as Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in 1973.

Those views could have implications for independent counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of President Trump.

Legal experts say his work on the D.C. Circuit bolsters his conservative credentials, but it also gives Democrats plenty of fodder on controversial topics in the looming confirmation fight such as a woman's access to abortion, gun rights, consumer protections and environmental regulations.

"I suspect this is going to be a rough, tough, down in the dirt, ear-pulling, nose-biting fight", Kennedy said.

Kavanaugh, 53, began his career as a clerk to Kennedy.

Hardiman was reportedly on the shortlist of candidates to replace the vacancy left by the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. He expressed renewed interest in Hardiman - the runner-up when Trump nominated Gorsuch, said two people with knowledge of his thinking who were not authorized to speak publicly. But the contestants in this game show aren't the potential nominees, who have already been carefully vetted by conservative legal groups the Heritage Foundation and the Federalist Society.

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