Published: Fri, July 13, 2018

Thailand cave rescue Brit diver says: 'We are not heroes'

Thailand cave rescue Brit diver says: 'We are not heroes'

Workers were Thursday packing up the industrial water pumps, heavy-grade machinery and construction equipment at the mouth of the Tham Luang cave, which had been a high-tech command center during the 18-day ordeal. The boys range in age from 11 to 16.

But the mission, which leaned on the expertise of elite foreign divers and Thai Navy SEALs, almost turned into a calamity. The children were well taken care of in the cave. Their discovery immediately prompted discussions on how to get them out, with initial reports suggesting that the safest way to rescue the team was to wait out the rainy season, which lasts until October, and guide them out once the flooded tunnels had dried.

A video of the boys in hospital was shown at the news conference. On Tuesday authorities said some of the boys had asked to eat bread with chocolate spread, but mostly they'll be given a food similar to milk which is rich in proteins and nutrients. It showed that many of them appeared to be in good condition.

They were also seen sitting cheerfully in their hospital beds, where they are being kept in isolation until doctors are sure they did not pick up any nasty diseases during more than two weeks in the dark.

Thongchai Lertwilairattanapong, a health department inspector, earlier told reporters one from the last group rescued on Tuesday had a lung infection and they were all given vaccinations for rabies and tetanus.

On Wednesday, they too were recovering, nursing battered hands and feet from wading through the cold water in the cave to reach the boys.

The movie would comparable to the 2015 film "The 33" starring Antonio Banderas, detailing the 2010 rescue of 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for over three months.


Described in a South Australia Ambulance Service statement as a "quiet and kind man" who "didn't think twice about offering his support on this mission" Harry, as he is known, was lauded for his work in throughout the rescue period. They would then need to recuperate at home for 30 days, he said.

"We worked until we forgot the time", said Captain Anan Surawan, chief of the 1st Special Forces Regiment.

The team became captured within a cave in Thailand on June 23 and survived for 18 long days before being miraculously rescued by a fearless group of global divers.

At least two Hollywood producers are already plotting a movie project about the Wild Boars soccer team and their coach in anticipation of global box office success. They were carried by stretcher in the compartments that hadn't flooded.

"It's Thai, Westerners, Europeans, Aussies - people from all over the world who helped bring these kids to safety", Scott told Reuters.

The story of the Thai boys lost and found and finally rescued has all the makings of a Hollywood drama, capped with a happy outcome, and film companies are scrambling to buy their story.

First, filmmakers need to secure the rights from each of the boys' families, the coach, and any rescuers they want to portray in order to get their firsthand accounts of what happened.

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