Published: Fri, July 20, 2018

Mystery 30-ton sarcophagus in Egypt found to contain three mummies

Mystery 30-ton sarcophagus in Egypt found to contain three mummies

A report in National Geographic reads: "One of the two archaeologists believes that, since Alexandria wasn't even founded until the fourth century BC, the massive sarcophagus may have been brought to the city empty, from an earlier, dynastic-period site down the Nile-such as Memphis-and then re-used to bury someone in later years".

Archaeologists have opened a black granite sarcophagus found in an ancient burial ground under Alexandria, Egypt.

Mostafa Waziry, the head of the Supreme Council for Antiquities, had some reassuring words in response to media rumors of bad luck.

"We've opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness, said Waziri".

Any sense of relief may have turned into disappointment, however, due to the condition of the bodies.

Along with the sewage, archaeologists found the remains of three skeletons inside the sarcophagus.

Mohamed Abd El Ghany  Reuters            
                    The sarcophagus is moved from the site in Alexandria Egypt
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters The sarcophagus is moved from the site in Alexandria Egypt

Pictures released by the ministry show the sarcophagus full of the liquid sewage, which must have seeped in at some point.

The 30-ton coffin is the largest yet found in Alexandria, prompting a swirl of theories in local and worldwide media that it may be the resting place of the ancient Greek ruler who in 331 BC founded the city that still bears his name. But there were no inscriptions, death masks, precious metals or amulets inside, suggesting that the deceased were not royalty as hoped, the Guardian reported.

Shaaban Abdel Amonem, one of the specialists in mummification who attended the opening, said initial assessments showed the trio were probably soldiers, with one of the skulls displaying evidence of arrow blows.

The other two skulls were reportedly identified as belonging to men. Modern technology will be used to help determine their individual ages and what they may have looked like. The sarcophagus will be transferred to the Military Museum.

The MOA considers this the biggest coffin unearthed yet from Alexandria, as it weights around 20 to 30 tons, with dimensions that are 185 cm tall, 265 cm long and 165 cm wide.


Like this: