Published: Fri, August 10, 2018
Science | By

Australian state now "100 per cent in drought"

Australian state now

New South Wales officials released figures on Wednesday showing that every part of the state is affected, with nearly one-quarter classified as being in "intense drought".

3 / 4 Farmers are struggling to feed their livestock.

Some exhausted graziers spend hours each day hand-feeding their stock because the ground is too dry for grass to grow.

Less than 10mm of rain was recorded in the western, northwest, and central areas of NSW over the past month and drier-than-normal conditions are forecast for the next three months across the majority of the state.

The US will subsidise farmers and buy unsold crops, among other measures; farmers growing soybeans, sorghum and wheat will get the most aid.

The current drought on the continent extends beyond North South Wales, with over half of the neighboring state of Queensland also in drought, the BBC reported.

Conditions are similarly dire in Queensland to the north, where the state government says almost 60 percent of land is suffering drought conditions.

Prime farming land around Coonabrabran, Broken Hill and between Orange and Dubbo have recorded the driest 18-month period since records began in 1900.


US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue recently said the USDA will act to assist farmers facing trade damage from "unjustified retaliation".

Much of southeastern Australia is struggling with drought but conditions in New South Wales are the driest and most widespread since 1965.

There was also cash for counselling and mental health services, with drought-related stress and even suicide a mounting concern, compounded by the isolation many feel on their remote properties.

The Government has responded with a compensation package to help rural communities, including two lump sum payments worth up to A$12,000 for eligible households.

"I think the only problem is it was probably a little bit late coming for some people".

This aerial photo shows cattle on a dry paddock in the drought-hit area of Quirindi in New South Wales.

James (left) and Harrison O'Brien feed grain to hungry calves at the family's drought-ravaged farm in Five Ways in the middle of NSW.

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