Published: Sun, August 12, 2018
Science | By

These very big shark teeth belonged to the megalodon's cousin

These very big shark teeth belonged to the megalodon's cousin

Museums Victoria was his next call; it eventually sent out a team to excavate the area, and several more 3-inch (9cm) teeth showed up right in the same spot, indicating the shark had died right there, 25 million years ago.

Though people have found single shark teeth belonging to the megatoothed shark before, Mullaly's find was the first time a set had been discovered in Australia, and only the third time a set of teeth belonging to the same individual Carcharocles angustidens had been found in the world.

Secondly, these rare fossils are among a handful of ancient shark teeth to have been found as a set.

In 2015, Philip Mullaly was walking on the beach near Victoria, Australia, in a hotbed of fossil finds known as Jan Juc, when he came across what looked like a serrated blade stuck into a boulder.

A local museum confirmed that the 7cm-long teeth belonged to an extinct species known as the great jagged narrow-toothed shark. "I was immediately excited, it was just ideal and I knew it was an important find that needed to be shared with people", Mullaly said.


According to the museum, these teeth provide evidence that a shark which would have grown to more than 30-feet in length, almost double the size of a great white, "once stalked Australia's ancient oceans" approximately 25 million years ago.

The recently found fossilized mega-shark teeth were dated 25-million-year-old and are now on display at the Melbourne Museum until October 7th. Fitzgerald said that each Carcharocles angustidens tooth they found came from a different spot in the shark's jaw, which meant that all of the teeth most likely came from the same individual megashark.

So the best news is that the Carcharocles angustidens is not going to kill us, or Jason Statham. At the same time, ancient teeth are seldom preserved, because the cartilage in their make-up doesn't fossilize easily. She could grow by more than nine metres in length.

He explained that nearly all fossils of sharks worldwide were just single teeth, and it was extremely rare to find multiple associated teeth from the same shark.

So with a team of paleontologists, Fitzgerald and Mullaly returned to the beach past year, which was south of Melbourne. "They are still sharp, even 25 million years later".

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