Published: Wed, September 05, 2018
Medical | By

Nurse Realizes She Cared For Pediatric Resident 28 Years Ago In NICU

Nurse Realizes She Cared For Pediatric Resident 28 Years Ago In NICU

They found out that he alwlays just the tiny newborn baby, whom she nursed 28 years ago. According to Vilma, she's happy that the guy chose as the place of work is the hospital, where he was born.

The encounter between the two was shared on Facebook last August 16 by the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford.

The story of their reunion at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital in Palo Alto has gone viral on social media. A recent chance encounter exemplifies the long-lasting bond nurses like Wong can develop with their patients.

Paediatric resident Brandon Seminatore (right) was doing a rotation at the same neonatal intensive care unit as nurse Vilma Wong (left) who treated him when he was a premature baby.

Seminatore weighed 2 pounds and 6 ounces, the size of a small pineapple, when he was born in 1990. Seminatore was finally able to leave the hospital with his parents.

"The world needs more Vilmas", noted one commenter.

Nearly three decades later, Wong saw a new face dressed in scrubs and asked his name. She asked him who he was and thought his name sounded familiar. "Brandon Seminatore", he responded. "I then got very suspicious because I remember being the primary nurse to a baby with the same last name". She asked the man about this personal detail - one of the few she remembered. Wong says he has the same dark eyes and alert expression. "Then she asked if my dad was a cop", he continued.


"They were the most wonderful nurses", said Laura Seminatore, who was a kindergarten teacher in 1990 when her only son was born and is now the principal at St. John Vianney Catholic school in San Jose.

Brandon said: "Meeting Vilma was a surreal experience".

After the face-to-face meeting, Seminatore texted his parents with the news.

Seminatore had done a month-long rotation at the NICU past year, but didn't know if both nurses still worked there. By that time, he was able to eat on his own and was beginning to thrive, Wong remembered.

Brandon was on my team and taking care of one of my patients.

Nurse intensive care 54-year-old Wilma Wong cares for premature newborn children for almost 30 years. Like the old photo, Wong is still in her scrubs and has a big smile on her face.

Seminatore told the Mercury News he doesn't know for sure whether his rocky early weeks played a role in his decision to become a healer. For Wong, heartwarming interactions like this are "kind of like your reward" for being a caregiver.

Like this: