Published: Thu, September 13, 2018
Science | By

'GET OUT OF ITS WAY!': 'Monster' Hurricane Florence aims to drench Carolinas

'GET OUT OF ITS WAY!': 'Monster' Hurricane Florence aims to drench Carolinas

Hurricane Florence, the monster Category 3 storm taking aim at the North and SC coastline, is expected to make landfall by the end of this week and bring with it devastating wind, rain and storm surge. The Category 4 storm is likely to produce "catastrophic" flooding in the eastern Carolinas, as well as destructive winds.

"We will experience power outages, we will have infrastructure damage, there will be homes damaged, there will be debris on the roads - this will be a storm that creates and causes massive damage to our country", announced Jeffrey Byard, Response and Recovery administrator for FEMA.

The National Hurricane Center's projected track had Florence hovering off the southern North Carolina coast starting Thursday night before finally blowing ashore.

The governor of Georgia has declared a state of emergency after forecasts showed Hurricane Florence possibly taking a south-west turn.

"The state is mobilizing all available resources to ensure public safety", Deal said.

President Donald Trump declared states of emergency for North and SC and Virginia, opening the way for federal aid. Workers are being brought in from the Midwest and Florida to help in the storm's aftermath, it said.

While one man concluded: 'We are about to get pounded, but since we have absolutely no control over it, all you can do is laugh, and pray for the best'.


"We hope to have something left when we get home", she said. "If it wasn't for them, I wouldn't have minded staying here".

On another barrier island just below the Bogue Banks, Steve Harrigan reported live from North Topsail Beach, where visitors and residents were largely heeding warnings from Gov. Roy Cooper (D-N.C.) to evacuate.

Speaking at a news conference on Wednesday, he said: "Disaster is at the doorstep and it's coming in".

As of Tuesday, more than 1.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia were warned to clear out.

Duke Energy, the second-largest energy company in the U.S., said Florence could knock out electricity to three-quarters of its four million customers in the Carolinas. A tropical storm watch was also in effect for parts of Virginia.

Tropical storm-force winds extended 195 miles (315 kilometers) from Florence's center, and hurricane-force winds reached out 70 miles (110 kilometers).

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