Published: Thu, September 13, 2018
Science | By

NASA revealed the extent of hurricane Florence from space

NASA revealed the extent of hurricane Florence from space

Astronaut Ricky Arnold, onboard the International Space Station, captured the hurricane churning in the Atlantic as it morphed into a monster storm.

From his orbiting perch, Gerst offered Earthlings yet another warning about the hurricane's dangers: "Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you". "The crew of @Space_Station is thinking of those who will be affected".

In another post, the astronaut marveled at Florence's size - reportedly 500 miles across - writing that the storm "is so enormous, we could only capture her with a super wide angle lens".

An American astronaut posted two additional photographs from the International Space Station, showing the storm aimed at Cape Hatteras, a thin and vulnerable strand of islands that jut out from North Carolina.

The weather agency also warned "life-threatening freshwater flooding is likely from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall event". Winds this morning reached 130 miles per hour (200 km/h) and will likely strengthen before it arrives, officials said.


This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Tropical Storm Florence, center, in the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018 at 2:45 p.m. EDT.

This photo provided by NASA shows Hurricane Florence from the International Space Station on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, as it threatens the U.S. East Coast. Gerst wrote. "It's chilling, even from space".

Hurricane Florence will be the first Category 4 storm to make a direct hit on North Carolina in more than 50 years and with sustained winds of 130mph, it's already pushing a storm surge and rain ahead of it.

Astronaut Alexander Gerst provides a view straight down into the eye of Hurricane Florence, headed toward the U.S. Southeast as of September 12, 2018.

Like this: