Published: Thu, September 13, 2018

Putin Says He Knows Identities of Accused Skripal Attackers

Putin Says He Knows Identities of Accused Skripal Attackers

Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Russia knew the real identity of two men accused by British prosecutors of trying to murder former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Britain.

Mr. Putin urged the men to address the media saying there was "nothing criminal" about them, as he spoke at an economic forum in the far eastern city of Vladivostok.

Putin's declaration came seven days after British authorities announced that they had charged two Russian men, identified as Aleksandr Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, with carrying out the poisioning on March 4.

An Interpol Red Notice and European arrest warrant have been issued, though the Russian Constitution forbids them from being extradited.

Scotland Yard released CCTV images of the two suspects at Salisbury train station on the day of the attack.

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, accused of attempting to murder Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia, in an image handed out by police in London on September 5, 2018.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said the attack was carried out by officers of the GRU intelligence service and nearly certainly approved "at a senior level of the Russian state". We'll see in the near future, ' he added.

The Skripals spent weeks in hospital in a critical condition after the poisoning.


Putin said Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov may soon make appearances in the media to protest their innocence.

Anti-terrorist police have made it clear they believe GRU agents had used aliases for their attack on Sergei Skripal, 67 and his daughter Yulia, 34.

'I hope they will turn up themselves and tell everything.

"We have repeatedly asked Russian Federation to account for what happened in Salisbury in March and they have replied with obfuscation and lies".

CCTV footage from early March shows the pair arriving at Heathrow Airport from Russian Federation, and also in the vicinity of Sergei Skripal's house on the day of the attack. Claiming that the substance used in the attack had been a Novichok-class nerve agent developed in the Soviet Union, London rushed to accuse Russian Federation of being involved in the incident.

He accused Britain of attempting "to unleash a disgusting anti-Russian hysteria". Two others also fell ill: Sturgess's boyfriend, Charlie Rowley; and police officer Nick Bailey.

Russian Federation had previously said the names given to them by British prosecutors were meaningless.

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