Published: Fri, September 14, 2018
Science | By

FLORENCE: Hurricane now a Category 2 storm, still unsafe

FLORENCE: Hurricane now a Category 2 storm, still unsafe

For example, Bojangles (BOJA) and Koninklijke Ahold Delhaize(ADRNY) have more than 20% exposure to a landfall in Wilmington, North Carolina.

"Disaster is at the doorstep and is coming in", Cooper said.

Administration officials say Mr. Merkley and MSNBC got it all wrong. With Hurricane Florence set to wallop the area as a Category 4 hurricane, there are fears the ponds could overflow or even collapse amid extremely heavy rain, sending vast amounts of manure from thousands of farms into rivers and contaminating groundwater.

Forecasters said Florence could become an extremely risky major hurricane sometime Monday and remain that way for days.

"We will reopen these stores once we complete our post-hurricane assessment and determine that it's safe for our employees and customers to return", the statement read. Current forecasts call for Florence to be at least a Category 3 storm when it arrives at the Carolinas.

Historic and potentially catastrophic flooding is possible along with life-threating storm surges of up to 12 feet are possible along the coasts.

SC ordered the mandatory evacuation of one million coastal residents while North Carolina ordered an evacuation of the Outer Banks, barrier islands that are a popular tourist destination.


No storm watches or warnings are in effect for Georgia.

Hurricane Florence is expected to bring high winds to North Carolina's coast by Thursday afternoon.

Although slow weakening is expected to begin by late Thursday, Florence is still forecast to be an extremely risky major hurricane when it nears the US coast late Thursday and Friday, the NHC added.

Last night, the National Hurricane Center shifted its forecast for the hurricane's path from northwest to slightly more west, raising the potential for tropic storm-force winds in parts of Florida as soon as Friday evening. Many areas in the low-lying city flood with routine rain storms, causing street closures and detours.

If these projections hold, University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy says "it's exceptionally bad news, as it smears a landfall out over hundreds of miles of coastline, most notably the storm surge".

Authorities in neighboring North Carolina ordered an evacuation of the Outer Banks, barrier islands that are a popular tourist destination, and parts of coastal Dare County. Cars and trucks full of people and belongings streamed inland.

US President Donald Trump has pledged that the federal government was "ready for the big one".

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