Published: Fri, September 14, 2018
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Hurricane Florence Zeroes In On Carolinas, Bringing 130 MPH Winds

Hurricane Florence Zeroes In On Carolinas, Bringing 130 MPH Winds

Hurricane Florence lumbered ashore in North Carolina with howling 90 miles per hour winds and terrifying storm surge early Friday, ripping apart buildings and knocking out power to a half-million homes and businesses as it settled in for what could be a long and extraordinarily destructive drenching.

Up to 1.7 million people have now been ordered to leave their homes as the United States braces for Hurricane Florence.

The hurricane was about 470 miles (755 km) east-southeast of Myrtle beach SC, with maximum sustained winds of 125 miles per hour (205 km/h), the Miami, Florida-based weather forecaster said.

Landfall is expected late Thursday or early Friday, and the National Hurricane Center fears the storm "will slow considerably or stall, leading to a prolonged and exceptionally heavy and risky rainfall event Friday-Sunday". The storm's forecast has shifted southward in the last 24 hours. Florence could then move slowly along the North Carolina and SC line then possibly move down the SC coast before actually making landfall later this weekend.

On Wednesday, we got an inside look at the planes at Lakeland Linder Airport.

Some 7,000 guard members are ready to mobilize in North Carolina, while 1,100 will be activated in SC. The southeast coast of North Carolina will experience a prolonged storm surge reaching up to nine to 13 feet from near the mouth of the Cape Fear to Cape Lookout.

People who thought they were safe from the onslaught of Hurricane Florence began boarding up and Georgia's governor declared a state of emergency Wednesday as uncertainty over the path of the monster storm spread worry along the Southeastern coast.

Enough rain could fall to break North Carolina's record for a tropical storm - 24 inches - set near Wilmington during Hurricane Floyd in 1999, said Greg Carbin, chief of forecast operations at the Weather Service's national prediction center.


Flight Director Paul Flaherty is preparing to fly into Hurricane Florence for a fourth time, and said he hopes to bring back good news, but so far, there's been no signs of that from the sky. She said it will become a "major flooding event". "I'll be living there for a few days".

Florence is so wide that a life-threatening storm surge was being pushed 300 miles ahead of its eye, and so wet that a swath from SC to OH and Pennsylvania could get deluged.

"Been through it!" Belli said, referring to Hurricane Hugo, which caused widespread damage in SC in 1989. "I will enjoy the quiet", he said.

For all other coastal counties, an evacuation went into effect Tuesday, Sept. 11 at noon.

In Virginia, 245,000 coastal residents were ordered to evacuate including from the Eastern Shore, another popular beachfront destination.

But despite the potentially devastating hurricane, forecast to make landfall on Friday with 130mph winds, people tried to offer some "relief" in the silence before the storm.

The Virginia National Guard is planning to initially bring up to 1,500 soldiers and airmen to offer help in the state's response operations.

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