Published: Tue, October 02, 2018
Medical | By

Texas surf park closes after man dies from rare 'brain-eating amoeba'

Texas surf park closes after man dies from rare 'brain-eating amoeba'

The BSR Surf Resort in Waco, Texas has temporarily shut its doors after a surfer from New Jersey died as a result of complications from Naegleria fowleri, which is often referred to as a "brain-eating amoeba".

"We were hopeful until the end, but unfortunately, on Friday, Sept. 21, we learned the heartbreaking news that Fabrizio was pronounced brain dead as a result of this brain-eating amoeba", the GoFundMe page reads.

But the "brain-eating amoeba" infections can also occur in inadequately chlorinated swimming pools or heated and contaminated tap water, hot springs, geothermal drinking water, and water heaters.

Stabile noticed something was wrong September 16 while mowing the lawn when a painful headache forced him to lie down.

According to the CDC, Naegleria fowleri infections are rare, with just 34 reported between 2008 and 2017.

"By the time Fabrizio was diagnosed, it was too late to administer the drug that had previously been provided to three of the only five known survivors in North America", Stephanie wrote.

The owner of BSR Cable Park, Stuart E. Parsons Jr., said the park will continue to comply with requests related to the investigation of Stabile's death.


The Naegleria fowleri amoeba is a free-living amoeba found in warm freshwater ponds, lakes and rivers, which feeds on bacteria but can cause a lethal infection in humans. Normally, people are infected when contaminated water enters through their nose, according to the agency.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) is now investigating the case and BSR has voluntarily ceased operation until conclusive results are available.

Stabile's family has created the Fabrizio Stabile Foundation for Naegleria Fowleri Awareness "to bring awareness to, and educate as many people as possible about, this rare and preventable infection", they said on GoFundMe.

Stabile, whose family said he was an avid outdoorsman who loved to surf, had been at the park on vacation.

'We are in compliance with the CDC guidelines and recommendations concerning Naegleria fowleri'. The organizations statistics indicate that since 1962 there have been 143 confirmed cases, of which only four people survived.

You can not get infected from swallowing water contaminated with Naegleria.

The infection can not be passed from person to person and typically occurs during the summer months of July, August and September.

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