Published: Mon, October 08, 2018
Science | By

Rock that was used as a doorstop a meteorite worth $100000

Rock that was used as a doorstop a meteorite worth $100000

This year, however, the man chose to find out everything about the mysterious rock, so he took it to Mona Siberscu at Central Michigan University's College of Science and Engineering.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically "no"-meteor wrongs, not meteorites", Sibescu said in a statement from CMU on Thursday, CNN reports".

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", Sibescu said.

The retiree's old rock turned out to be a nest egg that could be worth $100,000, or possibly even more. Upon purchasing it, he noticed a large rock holding the door open, according to Central Michigan University.

After analyzing the rock themselves, the Smithsonian Institution researchers confirmed the Sirbescu's first results.

This guy, who wanted to remain anonymous, bought a property in Edmore, Michigan, in 1998.

The farmer told him it was a meteorite, that it was part of the property and he could have it. The farmer told Mazurek that he and his father watched the chunk of rock slam into their property one night and picked it up the next day, when it was still warm to the touch.


When the new owner moved after a few years, he took the mystery rock, which he has kept as a doorstop and a show-and-tell item for his kids in school.

"I said, 'Wait a minute".

A man has discovered a rock he's been using as a doorstop for 30 years is a meteorite worth more than $100,000.

The meteorite's owner said that regardless of the buyer, he will donate 10 percent of the sale amount to the university.

An additional sample was sent to John Wasson, professor emeritus in the Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences department at the University of California, Los Angeles, who will conduct a neutron activation analysis to determine the full chemical composition of the meteorite and potentially reveal rare elements that could increase its value. The Smithsonian considered buying the meteorite for display.

You probably don't have many incredibly valuable artifacts laying around your house, but if you did you nearly certainly wouldn't be using them as doorstops, right?

Like this: