Published: Thu, October 11, 2018

Malaysia To Abolish Death Penalty, Says Minister

Malaysia To Abolish Death Penalty, Says Minister

"Since we are abolishing the sentence, all executions should not be carried out", Liew said as reported by The Star.

"I was pushing for the introduction into Philippine criminal laws the penalty of qualified reclusion perpetua, to ensure that, even in extraordinarily heinous crimes, our policy direction looks at restorative justice over punitive or retributive measures, while equally aware and conscious of the need to bring to justice perpetrators of the most egregious offenses", she said.

19 prisoners are now on death row but due to lack of infrastructure and capacity, PNG is still not ready to implement capital punishment.

And contrary to popular belief, the abolition of the death penalty does not lead to an increase in crime.

More than 1,200 people are on death row in Malaysia, which mandates hanging as punishment for a wide range of crimes including murder, drug trafficking, treason, kidnapping and acts of terror.

Liew added that all the paperwork for the abolishment of the law is in its final stages, and that the Attorney General (AG) had given the green light for it to be tabled in Parliament.

"We have had no executions in the last two years and we also changed the death penalty to an alternative sentence, no longer mandatory punishment".

A Malaysian court previous year ruled the case could proceed against Indonesian national Siti Aisyah and Doan Thi Huong of Vietnam after Kim Jong Nam's murder at Kuala Lumpur Airport.


Two Chilean tourists, now on trial for the murder of a Malaysian man, would also have faced the death penalty if found guilty of murder.

Malaysia's cabinet has agreed to abolish the death penalty, a senior minister said Thursday, in a decision hailed by rights groups.

The PNG Government reactivated the use of capital punishment in 2013 after a spate of violent killings drew worldwide attention.

"Drug-related offences will be different and consideration must be given to convicts who, for example, were drug mules, as compared to those who committed heinous crimes", said Mr Liew.

However, Liew said that if their sentence is commuted then the inmates will have to face life imprisonment because they have been the cause of several deaths, which is why they were given the death penalty in the first place.

"The death penalty is barbarous, and unimaginably cruel", N. Surendran, an adviser with the Lawyers for Liberty rights group, said in a statement.

The UN envoy noted the majority of executions today are carried out in China, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

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