Published: Wed, November 14, 2018

Central American migrants arrive in Tijuana

Central American migrants arrive in Tijuana

United States Marines with 7th Engineer Support Battalion, Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force 7, prepare to place concertina wire at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego California, US, November 10, 2018.

The latest figures on the migrant caravan predict somewhere between 3,500 to 5,000 Honduran migrants have made it to Mexico City and plan to travel north to the United States sometime over the next month.

A USA official speaking on the condition of anonymity confirmed to ABC News that border authorities are girding for the first group of about 100 to arrive in Tijuana by the end of the weekend. "These preparations include training exercises, deploying additional CBP personnel, and partnering with the USA military to harden our ports of entry and the border area between those legal crossings into the U.S".

U.S. Customs and Border Protection said it planned to close northbound lanes at the San Isidro and Otay Mesa border crossings, both near Tijuana, in advance of the arrival of the migrants.

Tijuana is at the westerly end of the border, about 38 kilometres from San Diego, California.

The group arrived in Mexico City last week and voted to walk toward Tijuana, a longer and safer route compared to a shorter trek across the Rio Grande into Texas.


Trump invoked the same national security powers he used to push his travel ban through and says he wants people to come to the USA legally.

Amnesty International said the discrimination highlighted the broader difficulties faced by LGBT asylum seekers as they cross Mexico, including increased violence and abuse from local authorities.

Mr Trump signed a decree that effectively suspended the granting of asylum for those who cross the border illegally, a move that could drastically slow claims at gates of entry.

Numerous smaller group are LGBTIQ, media reported, who say they parted ways with the main caravan after weeks of what they call discriminatory treatment by local residents and fellow travellers.

The largest group of migrants is about 1,500 miles away from Tijuana and is still moving on foot.

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