Published: Fri, January 11, 2019

Corbyn faces grassroots push for Labour to back second Brexit referendum

Corbyn faces grassroots push for Labour to back second Brexit referendum

"We put a good deal on the table that protects jobs and security".

If Labour won the confidence vote and a general election happened, there is also a lack of clarity as to what the party's policy on Brexit would be.

Lawmakers are due to vote next Tuesday on May's plans and are widely expected to defeat them after she failed to win over the Northern Irish party that props up her minority government."If the government can not pass its most important legislation, then there must be a general election at the earliest opportunity", Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will say, according to the text of a speech he will deliver in Wakefield, northern England, extracts of which were released by Labour.

"We have said that we will bring forward a vote of no confidence".

"If the government can not pass its most important legislation, then there must be a general election at the earliest opportunity".

Britain's main opposition Labour Party backed a proposal on Tuesday (8 January) that could mean the government needs parliamentary approval for a no-deal Brexit, putting up a new hurdle for Prime Minister Theresa May, write William James and Elizabeth Piper.

He faced a backlash from pro-EU campaigners at the end of previous year when he confirmed Labour would proceed with Brexit should it win power.


Responding to Mr Corbyn's expected comments, Labour MP Jo Stevens warned her leader of an "historic" election defeat if the party adopted a pro-Brexit position before a national poll.

Preparations for leaving without a deal - the default scenario if Mrs May's agreement is rejected - have been ramped up, with government and businesses activating and testing contingency plans created to limit the expected disruption.

In response to Corbyn, the chairman of May's Conservative Party said Labour did not have a plan for Brexit.

The visit has prompted speculation Mr Abe has been flown in to bolster global support for the prime minister's Brexit agreement.

She told BBC Radio 5 Live's Pienaar's Politics: "What I would like them to be particularly focusing on is taking the arguments as to why we should remain in the European Union to people who voted to leave and to try to change some hearts and minds".

"I don't think that was really the effort".

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