Published: Wed, March 13, 2019
Medical | By

New Italian law requires students to be vaccinated or face repercussions


Italian parents have been told to keep their kids home from school unless they are able to prove they have been properly vaccinated - or risk having to open up their wallet.

The law, passed in 2017 by a previous government, requires children to be vaccinated against 10 diseases in order to attend daycare and nursery school. The consequences for failing to comply with the legislation reportedly varies depending on how old the child is.

Children up to the age of six years will be excluded from nursery and kindergarten without proof of vaccination under the new rules.

These include vaccinations for chickenpox, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella.

"No vaccine, no school", Giulia Grillo, Italy's Minister of Health, told La Repubblica.

Following months of fiery debate - and measles outbreaks - a new law banning unvaccinated children from Italy's classrooms has come into effect.


The city of Bologna reportedly has at least 300 children who now do not comply with the vaccination requirements and are at risk of suspension from school.

Italian schoolchildren will be unable to attend school if they aren't vaccinated. ". No vaccine, no school".

Regional authorities are taking care of the situation through different ways, report Italian media.

"Italy is part of a global trend of distrust in mediators-doctors and scientists-who can interpret and explain data", La Sapienza University of Rome history of medicine and bioethics teacher Andrea Grignolio told CNN in 2018.

While immunization rates hovered around 80 per cent in 2017, when the law was passed, the Times added, the country now is nearing (and in some areas has already met) the World Health Organization target of 95 per cent.

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