Published: Sat, March 16, 2019

New Zealand gun laws to change: Ardern

New Zealand gun laws to change: Ardern

The main suspect in mass shootings at two New Zealand mosques was charged with one count of murder on Saturday, a day after the attack that killed 49 people and wounded dozens, prompting the prime minister to vow reform of the country's gun laws.

Before Ms Ardern's announcement, former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark told the ABC that while the country had gun control, there was room for improvement.

In signs police say show a well-planned attack, army personnel were also called in to dismantle explosive devices found in a stopped vehicle and officers were in the evening searching a house in Dunedin, 360 kilometres away, clearing nearby homes for safety.

"I want to reassure all New Zealanders that we are doing absolutely everything in our power to respond to this attack, and deploying all available resources in communities across New Zealand", Bush said.

Public events across the nation scheduled for the weekend have been cancelled amid safety fears, with police officers and helicopters on patrol.

He live-streamed footage of himself going room-to-room, victim to victim, shooting the wounded from close range as they struggled to crawl away in the main Christchurch mosque.

Police on Saturday confirmed 42 were still being treated for injuries, including a five-year-old in critical condition.

She said she had been advised the gunman obtained a Category A licence in November 2017, and "under that, he was able to acquire the guns that he held".

Syed Mazharuddin, who witnessed the Linwood attack, said that attendants were praying when they heard...


"There have been attempts to change our laws in 2005, 2012 and after an inquiry in 2017".

"While work is being done as to the chain of events that led to both the holding of this gun licence, and the possession of these weapons, I can tell you one thing right now - our gun laws will change".

Another witness, Mahmood Nasir, said everyone ran to the back doors to save themselves. This is a partial transcription of those press conferences in which she touches on her country's diversity, sending condolences to victims and their families and communities.

Notification of a shooting at the second mosque followed, before video emerged of police ramming a auto and pulling out the occupant.

The suspect who claimed responsibility for the shootings left a 74-page anti-immigrant manifesto in which he explained who he was and his reasoning for the attack.

New Zealand police described the footage shot by the gunman - which AFP has verified, but is not distributing - as "extremely distressing" and warned web users that they could be liable for up to 10 years in jail for sharing such "objectionable content".

Green Leader Elizabeth May did not mention Muslims in her first Tweet but retweeted several others who did.

Expression shock, sorrow and revulsion, Christchurch's mayor Lianne Dalziel called for her city to come together in kindness.

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