Published: Wed, October 09, 2019
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Trump says Turkey's attack on Syria is 'a bad idea'

Trump says Turkey's attack on Syria is 'a bad idea'

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced that his country's military has launched a cross-border operation into northern Syria.

Turkey launched its military operation to flush Kurds allied with the US out of northeastern Syria Wednesday, sparking outrage in Congress and creating rare bipartisan unity about the risks to Kurds, US national security interests, regional stability and the fight against ISIS.

For Turkey, which views Kurdish YPG fighters in northeast Syria as terrorists due to their ties to militants waging an insurgency inside Turkey, an influx of non-Kurdish Syrians would help it secure a buffer against its main security threat.

"We will protect the territorial integrity of Syria and free the people of the region from the clutches of terror".

"Where Turkey's security is concerned, we determine our own path but we set our own limits", Oktay said.

The two operations were in line with the country's right to self-defense borne out of global law, UN Security Council resolutions, especially no. 1624 (2005), 2170 (2014) and 2178 (2014), and under the right to self-defense under Article 51 of the UN Charter, while being respectful of Syria's territorial integrity.

In 1978 a political organisation called the PKK was formed, also known as The Kurdistan Workers' Party.

On Monday, Erdogan said United States troops had started to withdraw after a phone call he had with Trump, adding that talks between Turkish and USA officials on the matter would continue. The area controlled by the PYD - referred to by many as Rojava, the Kurdish word for the region - has established autonomy with networks of local councils and forums that aim to promote decentralised democracy (though others question how much power they actually hold).

The aerial activity has also intensified in the 10th Tanker Base Command of Incirlik air base in Adana, southern Turkey, as part of the operation.

Just a couple of months ago the Pentagon reestablished a troop presence in Saudi Arabia after a lengthy absence, and in May it added air and naval forces in the region in response to what it views as worrying threats from Iran.


Taking responsibility for ISIS will be a "nightmare" for Turkey, said Yaşar Yakış, who served as the country's foreign minister under prime minister Abdullah Gul between 2002 and 2003.

"The sole objective of the commenced operation is to eliminate the threat of terror against Turkey", he added. The solution: sending at least a million of them back over the border into Syria.

Ankara has also stressed that supporting terrorists under the pretext of fighting Daesh is unacceptable.

Turkey has a 911-kilometer (566-mile) border with Syria and it has long decried the threat from terrorists east of the Euphrates and the formation of a "terrorist corridor" there. The operation is aimed at mostly-Kurdish forces partnered with the U.S.

Their plan is to resettle up to two million of the more than 3.6 million Syrian refugees now living in Turkey in the area.

The two operations were in line with the country's right to self-defense borne out of worldwide law, UN Security Council resolutions, especially no. 1624 (2005), 2170 (2014) and 2178 (2014), and under the right to self-defense under Article 51 of the UN Charter, while being respectful of Syria's territorial integrity.

Kurdish forces have dug trenches and tunnels in both areas, covering streets with metal canopies to block the cameras of Turkish drones. In 2015 and 2016, a series of terror attacks in Turkey claimed by ISIS killed at least 276 people.

Trump said Turkey had "committed to protecting civilians, protecting religious minorities" and "ensuring no humanitarian crisis takes place", and said Ankara "is now responsible for ensuring all ISIS fighters being held captive remain in prison and that ISIS does not reconstitute in any way, shape, or form".

The U.S. has more than 10,000 troops based across the Middle East, including about 5,200 in Iraq, 1,000 in Syria and several thousand others at bases in Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

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