Published: Fri, November 08, 2019

Anthropologists unearth remains of mammoths trapped in 15,000-year-old pits

Anthropologists unearth remains of mammoths trapped in 15,000-year-old pits

The remains of 14 woolly mammoths were found inside the 15,000-year-old, human-dug pits. They then used their boneyard blueprint to paint a picture of how the hunt went down.

Researchers have worked at the site, near where President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's government is building a new airport for Mexico City, for nearly 10 months, recovering 824 bones in the roughy 26-feet-deep pit.

The skeletal remains were found in Tultepec, near the site where President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador's Government is building a new airport for Mexico City. Mammoths, many researchers assumed, were only attacked by humans when hunters happened upon the animals in a compromised position - a mammoth stuck in a swamp, for example. The recently discovered traps for the giant animals were also the first of its kind and is also an unexpected context of mammoth hunting.

Each pit was filled with bones, and some showed signs that they'd been butchered. "The herds grew, reproduced, died, were hunted", archaeologist Luis Cordoba told local media.


Specifically, scientists hypothesized that groups of 20 to 30 hunters would "herd" the mammoths into the holes with torches and branches.

Archaeologists unearthed the 5-foot-deep, 82-foot-wide pits in Tultepec, outside of Mexico City - in an area that was going to be used as a dump, according to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

The two pits were found on a site that's earmarked for use as a garbage dump. "They lived alongside other species, including horses and camels".

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