Published: Fri, November 08, 2019
Science | By

Italy is the first country making climate change lessons compulsory

Italy is the first country making climate change lessons compulsory

Italy's education minister announced this week that, starting in September 2020, all students will receive 30 hours of climate change education as part of the school curriculum.

Speaking earlier to Reuters news agency, Fioramonti said all state schools would dedicate 33 hours per year, nearly one hour per school week, to climate change issues.

"The entire ministry is being changed to make sustainability and climate the centre of the education model".

The new Italian budget tabled by the leftist coalition of the Five star Movement and the Democratic Party (PD) will also look to increase places to hire around 24,000 temporary workers in the education sector by the end of September of next year.

However, Fioramonti said his ministry would stand strong against the opposition. Middle schoolers would be expected to learn more technical information, and high school students would explore the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in depth.

Considering the fact that turning out to be minister, Fioramonti has been criticized by right-wing opposition parties for supporting placing college students protesting weather adjust and backing taxes on plastic and sugary drinks.

US President Donald Trump has described global warming as "a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese".


Fioramanti suggested that Salvini needed to be educated.

With this example, the minister of Education has pointed out that in seeking to fight this kind of "nonsense", teaching children that "this is the most important challenge that humanity has faced".

But Salvini still looms over the wobbly 5-Star-led government, and Italy's many government collapses in recent years have cut short other educational programs. He said that the conditions had not been right to go forward with the new curriculum then, but that they were now.

One environmental activist expressed reservations that Fioramanti's plan may be too dogmatic.

Chicco Testa, president of the Assombiente environmental group, urged officials to ensure that children are exposed to varied opinions, including those who claim that climate change is not primarily caused by man. "Listening to people who say different things is good", he said.

Fioramonti said the new government, which has got off to a shaky start with weeks of bickering over the budget, 'will only last if it is fearless, ' and stops letting Salvini set the news agenda.

"It's a world's initially to have a (compulsory) countrywide instruction in that perception", Cramarossa said.

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