Published: Tue, September 15, 2020
Economy | By

British MPs back Brexit bill despite anger over treaty breach

British MPs back Brexit bill despite anger over treaty breach

The prime minister insisted the legislation, which would put the United Kingdom in breach of global law by breaking the terms of the treaty signed with Brussels, was a necessary "legal safety net" to protect the relationship between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Sajid Javid, Conservative MP and the previous Chancellor of the Exchequer (finance minister, in other words), had also come out against the bill, saying in a tweet that he could not see why it would be necessary to break global law in the instance of the Internal Market Bill.

Two ruling Tory party members of the parliament- Sir Roger Gale and Andrew Percy- voted against the bill on Monday night, while a further 30 abstained, which includes general absences from the House.

The Commons also voted against a Labour amendment to reject the bill entirely by 349 votes to 213.

MPs voted in favour of a second reading of the Internal Markets Bill by a majority of 77.

He says that threatens the integrity of the UK.

The European Parliament trade committee negotiator for EU-UK relations has said the European Union has made compromises and shown openness in its approach to trade negotiations with Britain, but would not proceed unless the UK's Internal Markets Bill is amended or withdrawn.

Johnson, though, said it was essential to counter "absurd" threats from Brussels including that London put up trade barriers between Britain and Northern Ireland and impose a food blockade - steps he said threatened the UK's unity.

Cox, previously a strong supporter of Johnson on Brexit, said he wouldn't support the proposal when the House of Commons takes its first vote on the contentious legislation later Monday.


He said it could mean levies of 61% on Welsh lamb, 90% on Scottish beef and 100% on Devonshire clotted cream, and would "carve tariff borders across our own country".

David Cameron, prime minister of the United Kingdom at the time of the Brexit referendum, became the last living former British prime minister to express his concerns about the bill, warning hours before the debate that "passing an act of Parliament and then going on to break an worldwide treaty obligation is the very, very last thing you should contemplate".

With Starmer in self-quarantine after possible exposure to the coronavirus, Labour's shadow business secretary Ed Miliband stood in for the party leader during Monday's vote, blasting Johnson for attempting to violate the withdrawal agreement he himself signed.

"Either he was not straight with the country in the first place or he did not understand it", said Miliband.

"Because a competent government would never have entered into a binding agreement with provisions it could not live with".

Speaking to reporters on Monday morning, Mr Cameron said: "Passing an act of parliament and then going on to break an worldwide treaty obligation is the very, very last thing you should contemplate".

All five of Britain's living former prime ministers have expressed concern about his plan.

He suggested other colleagues were "holding their fire" until later in the bill's passage, with a group led by ex-minister Sir Bob Neill pressing for a "parliamentary lock" on the government's ability to exercise the powers.

Like this: