Published: Thu, January 14, 2021
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Cheers! French wine, vines headed home after year in space

Cheers! French wine, vines headed home after year in space

In this November 2019 photo provided by Space Cargo Unlimited, researchers from the company prepare bottles of French red wine to be flown from Wallops Island, Va., to the International Space Station.

Researchers from Space Cargo Unlimited prepare bottles of French red wine to be flown from Wallops Island, Va., to the International Space Station on November 2, 2019.

Space Cargo Unlimited (SCU), the company behind the project, intends to open some of the bottles in February during a private event, after which months of chemical testing will take place.

The spaceship is now scheduled for splashdown on Wednesday night in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Tampa, Florida.

Previous cargo Dragon spacecraft were attached and removed from the space station using the station's robotic Canadarm2. It is the first undocking of a USA commercial cargo craft from the International Docking Adapter on the station's space-facing port of the Harmony module.

Gaume said that farm goods such as grapes would have to adjust to harsh weather in the face of climate change.


He explained, "Being French, having some good food and good wine is part of life". He'll be among the lucky few taking a sip. In addition, 320 Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon vine fragments, also known as canes in the grape-growing industry, were delivered by SpaceX last March.

According to him, the goal of the experiment done by Space Cargo Unlimited is to see and learn how subjecting agricultural products in extreme environments, lack of gravity and weightlessness can affect the plants.

The carefully packed wine - each bottle nestled inside a steel cylinder to prevent breakage - remained corked aboard the orbiting lab - none for the astronauts to try.

There's another benefit. Gaume expects future explorers to the moon and Mars will want to enjoy some of Earth's pleasures.

The SpaceX capsule You'll return a Bordeaux state to Earth when it's littered on Wednesday - and it's not going to be normal after aging in outer space for over a year.

Other cargo modules tend to be affected by pollution and end burned-up when reentering the Earth's atmosphere.

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